Gatton Murders - Patrick Murphy Evidence

Gatton Murders

!!! Finally After Years Of Research, Albeit Still Only A Theory.

I Am 99% Certain Who DUNNIT !!!

AT LAST YOU CAN FIND OUT BELOW

The Gatton Tragedy Exposed At Last. An Examination Of The Secrets And Lies.

Click Here To Buy Your Copy

Home  The Players  Solve The Crime  Photos and Pics  Buy The Books  In Depth Info/Motives/Theories/Proof/Evidence

Listen To Radio 4BC Interview

Privacy Statement

Anyone with any information, assistance or ideas.

Please Contact: info@gattonmurders.com

Or Phone FreeCall Steve: 1800 068 303

Patrick Murphy Evidence

25/01/1899

Patrick Murphy, brother of the victims, stated that on the night of the murder he proceeded from his home to Gatton. About 20 minutes past 9 he met Michael and his two sisters in a trap half a mile on the Gatton side of the slip rail. After speaking to them he rode to Gatton. They drove homewards. That was the last he saw of them alive.
Patrick Murphy, a brother of the victims of the tragedy, stated that Michael Murphy was 29 years of age; Norah was 27, and Ellen about 18.

Witness was working at the Agricultural College, Gatton.

On Boxing Day last he was at his father’s house in the evening at about 8 o’clock he saw the three deceased there.

They were getting ready to go into Gatton, and his brother Michael was putting the horse into William M’Neill’s trap.

The horse was his father’s property.

Witness left home before the deceased, and went along the road to Gatton.

The deceased caught up to him on the road about a mile on the Gatton side of their home. He knew the horse well; it was a very stupid animal, and he thought it was deaf, but fairly fast in harness, but not at all free.

The deceased passed witness, and went on.

Witness passed the schoolmaster’s two daughters, the Misses Wilson, the Tent Hill side of Cook’s. That was about twenty minutes past 8 o’clock, and about five minutes after the deceased had passed him.

Sergeant Arrell and Michael Connolly came along at Deep Gully, and rode about a chain behind him all the way.

He met Miss Florence Lowe at Logan’s Hill, about 200 yards on the Gatton side of the house. She was going towards Tent Hill, and was riding.

Witness then met his brother and sisters (the deceased) again in the trap, and they were going towards home.

That was at about a-quarter or twenty minutes past 9 o’clock.

They stopped, and spoke for about three minutes.

That was rather more than half a-mile from Moran’s sliprails.

Witness saw deceased start on again, and he came on to Gatton.

Two or three minutes after leaving them he met a man named Albert Murray, a brother-in-law of Mr. Logan, and who was working for the latter.

Witness stayed for a few minutes in town at Mrs. Marsh’s, and then went on to the College. He did not see his brother or sisters again.

Witness was working at the Agricultural College, Gatton.

On Boxing Day he was at his father's house, and in the evening about 8 o'clock he saw the three deceased there.

They were getting ready to go into Gatton, and his brother Michael was putting a horse into M'Neill's trap.

Witness left home before the deceased. He went along the road to Gatton, and the deceased caught up to him on the road about a mile on the Gatton side of their home.

He knew the horse well. It was a very stupid animal, and he thought it was deaf, but it was fairly fast in harness.

The deceased passed witness, and went on.

Witness passed the schoolmaster's two daughters, the Misses Wilson, on the Tent Hill side of Cook's.

That was about 20 minutes past 8 o’clock.

About five minutes after the deceased had passed him Sergeant Arrell and Michael Connolly came along the Deep Gully, and rode about a chain behind him all the way.

He met Miss Florence Lowe at Logan's Hill 200 yards on the Gatton side of the house. She was going towards Tent Hill, and riding.

Witness then met his brother and sisters again in the trap. They were going towards home. That was about a quarter or twenty minutes past 9 o'clock.

They stopped, and spoke about three minutes. That was rather more that half a mile from Moran's slip rails. Witness saw the deceased start up again, and he came on to Gatton.

Two or three minutes after leaving them he met a man named Albert Murray. Witness stayed a few minutes in town at Mrs. Marsh's and then went on to the college. He did not see his brother or sisters alive again.

7/10/1899

TOOMEY'S EVIDENCE CONTRADICTED.
Patrick Murphy, labourer, living at Gatton, and a brother of the deceased, was called.

The Chairman: Were you present when the evidence was given by Toomey yesterday? -No.

You know he stated that you, shortly after the murder, expressed the opinion of the guilt of M'Neill, and informed him you had searched his clothing, and that you had found nothing. Do you wish to contradict that evidence? -Yes.

What did you say? -I didn't say I suspected M'Neill. I didn't tell Toomey I suspected M'Neill.

Did you at any time say you suspected him? -No.

You never mentioned M'Neill at all to Toomey? -We were talking about M'Neill.

Well, what do you wish us to believe? That I did not suspect him at all.

Did you examine his clothing? -No.

Did Toomey ask you about the clothing? He asked me if I saw blood on the clothes.

Toomey says the reason he did not ask you if there was blood on his clothes was because you said there was none at first, and allayed his fears? -He asked me if there was blood on his clothes, and I said no.

Mr. Dickson: Well, when you were at home you were discussing the murder? Yes.

Did you form any opinion? -No.

Had you any idea? -No.

Did you tell Toomey you had an idea? No, not then.

When did you? -About two months afterwards.

Do you object to tell who? -The man Day.

The Chairman: Do you know whether any examination was ever made by the detective police, or any police, of M'Neill's clothing? -No, not that I know of.

Or his room? -No.

Were you about your father and mother's premises for any time? -Yes, for about a fortnight after the murder.

And during that time so far as you know no examination was made? -No.

Well, you say you never examined his clothing? -No.

When you were talking to Toomey who was there? -Sergeant Quitter.

Acting Sergeant Toomey: I should like to ask some questions.

Do you remember when I first spoke to you? -Yes.

How long after the murders? -About three weeks.

Did I not see you at your own house? -Oh, yes. You saw me a few days afterwards.

Did I not speak to you a day afterwards in Gatton? -I don't remember.

Did I not arrange several private interviews with you in passing through Gatton? -Yes.

What were they about? -One about a man named ____________; another about the Ryan's, and another about M'Neill.

Mr. Dickson: When was this? -About a month afterwards.

Acting Sergeant Toomey: Tell us what occurred about M'Neill? -You asked me if I suspected M'Neill, and I said no. Others told me they suspected him. I then made inquiries about M'Neill to see if there were any grounds of suspecting him, and found none. Yes? -You also asked me if I saw any blood on his clothes, and I said no.

Do you remember I asked you if any of his clothes were missing? -Yes.

What did you say? -I didn't think so.

Who was present when this conversation took place? -Sergeant Quilter.

Did you never have any conversation about M'Neill when Arrell was present? -No. I may be making a mistake as to the sergeant. It may have been Quilter.

Do you remember me meeting you one night when you were going home from the college and giving you certain information, and asking you to make inquiries at home? -Yes.

Did I not ask you to make inquiries whether M'Neill was at home that night? Yes.

What was the result? -The reply was that he was at home.

Did you not tell me you enquired from M'Neill's wife? -I believe I did.

She was sleeping in the same room as M'Neill? -Yes.

Assuming you told me that you had examined M'Neill's clothing, and did suspect him, have you ever heard of me having said that to any one before I gave evidence here? -No.

Had you any reason to think I did say so? No.

Of course you deny that you did examine M'Neill's clothing on the morning of the discovery of the murder? -I do.

And of course it is only reasonable that you should.

Mr. Sadleir: What clothing had M'Neill? -He had an extra pair of trousers besides the clothing he had on.

Is that all? -That is all I knew he had.

Where were the trousers? -Hanging in a room.

Mr. Dickson: Whom did you ask about M'Neill? - His wife, my father, and brothers.

You didn't suspect him at the time you made these inquiries? -No.

Mr. Garvin: Who did you suspect? -A man named Day.

When did you first suspect him? -About two months afterwards.

What brought you to suspect him? -Some statements I heard made.

What were they? -The boy Carroll said he was the man on the road when he passed.

Is that all? -That was all.

Do you suspect any one now? -Only him.

And only for the same reasons given us here already? -That is all.

Acting Sergeant Toomey: There is another question I should like. He stated I had three interviews with him. (To witness): How many times did I interview you at the college?-Once.

How many times did I see you in Gatton? Three times.

That would be four times then? -Yes.

16/10/1899

Sub-inspector Galbraith was examined by Detective Toomey as to Patrick Murphy’s denial of a statement that he had told Toomey he (Murphy) had suspected M’Neill of the murder, and searched his clothes.

Galbraith said he was told by Toomey at the time that Murphy had given this information.

He had seen that Toomey and Murphy became very “chummy,” and he did not interfere.

Online