Gatton Murders - Jeremiah Murphy Evidence

Gatton Murders

!!! Finally After Years Of Research, Albeit Still Only A Theory.

I Am 99% Certain Who DUNNIT !!!

AT LAST YOU CAN FIND OUT BELOW

The Gatton Tragedy Exposed At Last. An Examination Of The Secrets And Lies.

Click Here To Buy Your Copy

Home  The Players  Solve The Crime  Photos and Pics  Buy The Books  In Depth Info/Motives/Theories/Proof/Evidence

Listen To Radio 4BC Interview

Privacy Statement

Anyone with any information, assistance or ideas.

Please Contact: info@gattonmurders.com

Or Phone FreeCall Steve: 1800 068 303

Jeremiah Murphy Evidence

10/03/1899

Jeremiah Murphy aged 20, a brother of the last witness, deposed that while in Gatton on Christmas Eve a man named Ted Chadwick asked him if he would bring his sisters into a dance at Gatton on Boxing Night.

He (witness) promised to try and persuade them, but pointed out that there was a dance at Mount Sylvia the same night.

No one else was present at this conversation.

Chadwick said the Gatton girls wanted him to arrange a dance, but he did not say who was coming.

On Christmas Day he mentioned about the dance to the family.

Witness went to the Mount Sylvia dance on Boxing Night.

After passing Logan's, and between there and Bannerman's, where the dance was held, he did not see a loose horse with the saddle on.

He didn't see Con. O'Brien at the dance, and didn't hear anything of the other dance at Gatton.

He left the dance about 3 o'clock, and reached home as day was breaking.

He did not see anyone between Barlow's and his father's place.

When he reached home he did not see the pony that was usually running about the premises.

This beast was not easy to catch when it had been out for some time.

The horse could have been there, without witness having seen it.

There was one dog about the place.

Witness took off his saddle, put it on the veranda, and let the horse go.

He did not go to the harness room.

He went to bed, and on awaking about 6 o'clock he found a man named Robert Smith had come into his room and gone to bed.

He proceeded with his milking, Jack (John Murphy) passing the remark that the girls had not come home from the dance. (He and William were milking)

Before they finished, M'Neill came over and said it was a funny thing they (meaning Norah, Helen, and Michael) had not come home from the dance, and that they must have had a smash up.

He also said some one ought to go in after them. Witness said, “they may have stopped in at Walker's place.”

They had never stopped at Walker's before; but he thought the trap might have broken down, and they had remained there while it was being repaired. He and his brother then had breakfast.

Afterwards he did not see M'Neill about; but after 9 o'clock, when they were chaff cutting, M'Neill rode up, looking bad.

Bob Smith came and said they had been murdered in a paddock near Gatton.

Witness knew M'Neill had gone into town, but could not say who told him.

Smith also said Bill (meaning M'Neill) had found them.

They then went towards the house, and met M’Neill coming out to them. M'Neill said to William, "My God, Bill, such a mess you never saw in all your life.

He also said “their hands were tied behind their backs, and their heads bashed in, in a paddock at Gatton."

He could not remember what was also said.

Inspector Urquhart: Try and remember, Murphy, because this is of great consequence to everybody? -I don't remember who he said found them.

Did he tell you he heard the news in Gatton? - I don't remember him saying anything.

Did you ask him for any details? -I didn’t ask him.

Did your brothers? -I didn't hear them, if they did.

The Police Magistrate: Did you get any information afterwards-when you cooled down-say, in two or three days? -I don't remember.

Inspector Urquhart: Did you ask him whether anybody was with the bodies? -No.

Did your brothers? -I didn't hear them.

Didn’t ask any question whatever? -No.

Did your mother say anything before she left to go to the scene of the murder? -She said, "Whoever did it didn't mean it for my children."

Did you see Mrs. M'Neill that day? -Yes.

Do you remember anything she said? -No.

Did you and your brothers remain at home all that day? -Yes.

You didn't get your horses and go about looking? -No.

You know the country well, and so do your brothers? -Yes.

Nothing wrong with you that morning, was there? -No.

Well, don't you know that the men who did that crime could not be very far away by that time? -No answer.

Didn’t somebody suggest you should make a push in some direction? -No.

Did you think of it yourself? -No, I didn’t.

Did you know how many policemen there were at Gatton at the time? -Yes.

How many? -Two.

You know there were no more? -Yes.

The Police Magistrate: Are you not in the Mounted Infantry? -Yes.

The Police Magistrate: Didn't it strike you to go to your comrades and ask them to help you? -No.

The Police Magistrate: That is what you should have done. They could think of it themselves. I had enough to think of.

The Police Magistrate: You heard of it first; they probably didn't hear of it till next day.

Inspector Urquhart: It is simply a fact that you stayed at home that day, and did nothing at all? -I stayed at home with my sister, Mrs. M'Neill.

But there were others there? -They were strangers.

Surely some of you could have got away? -There was myself. Jack, and Pat there.

And Katie? -Yes.

When you heard of the thing, did it strike you that any particular person-might have done it? -No.

When M'Neill came to you at the hayshed was he wearing the same clothes as the day before when at the Mount Sylvia races? -I don't know; I didn't notice.

Was he wearing the same coat? -I don't know.

Did you notice his hat? Does he wear a straw hat? -He wears a straw hat now.

Did he then? -I think he did.

Did he own any other kind of hat? -That was the only one he had at our place.

Did you boys have other kinds of hats? -Yes.

Were they about the place? -Yes.

He had never seen any writing like that shown him.

The writing shown to Jeremiah Murphy was not available for the Press.

15/04/1899

He had gone to a dance at Mount Sylvia— in the opposite direction to Gatton — on Boxing Night, and reached home as day was breaking.

When he reached home he did not see the pony that was usually running about the premises. This beast was not easy to catch when it had been out for some time. The horse could have been there without witness having seen it.

On getting up shortly after six o'clock this witness and his brother William started their milking, and before they were finished M'Neill came to them and said it was strange the party had not returned; they might have had a smash, and someone should go and look for them." After breakfast the brothers did not see M'Neill about, but about 9 o'clock he rode in past where they were chaff-cutting "looking bad."

Bob Smith came and said the three had been murdered in a paddock near Gatton.

Witness knew M'Neill had gone into town, but could not say who had told him. Smith also said Bill (meaning M'Neill) had found them.

M'Neill said to William, "My God, Bill, such a mess you never saw in all your life." He also said their hands were tied behind their backs, and their heads bashed in in a paddock at Gatton. He could not remember what was also said.

Inspector Urquhart — Try and remember, Murphy, because this is of great consequence to everybody? — I don't remember who he said found them.

Did he tell you he heard the news in Gatton? — I don't remember him saying anything.

Did you ask him for any details? — I didn't ask him.

Did your brothers?— l didn't hear them if they did.

The Police Magistrate — Did you get any information afterwards — when you came down, in two or three days? — I don't remember.

The Inspector— Did you ask him whether anybody was with the bodies? — No.

Did your brothers? — I didn't hear them.

Didn't ask any question whatever? — No.

Did your mother say anything before she left to go to the scene of the murder? — She said, "Whoever did it didn't mean it for my children."

Did you see Mrs. M'Neill that day?— Yes.

Do you remember anything she said? — No.

Have you always a blank memory like this? — It is not bad, but I cannot remember at a time like this.

It is just the time you ought to remember.

Did you and your brothers remain at home all that day? — Yes.

You didn't get your horses and go about looking? — No.

You know the country well, and so do your brothers? — Yes.

Nothing wrong with you that morning was there? — No.

Well, don't you know that the men who did that crime could not be very far away by that time? — No answer.

Didn't somebody suggest you should make a push in some direction? — No.

Did you think of it yourself? — No, I didn't.

Did you know how many policemen there were at Gatton at the time?— Yes.

How may? — Two.

You know there were no more?— Yes.

The Police Magistrate — Are you not in the Mounted Infantry? — Yes.

Didn't it strike you to go to your comrades and ask them to help you? — No.

That is what you should have done — They could think of it themselves. I had enough to think of.

You heard of it first; they probably didn't hear of it till next day.

Inspector Urquhart — It is simply a fact that you stayed at home that day and did nothing at all? — I stayed at home with my sister, Mrs. M'Neill.

But there were others there? — They are strangers.

Surely some of you could have got away? — There was myself, Jack, and Pat there.

And Katie?— Yes. When you heard of the thing did it strike you that any particular person might have done it? — No.

Had you any suspicion? — No.

Have you since? — Yes.

The Police Magistrate — Don't give any names.

The Inspector— When your mother said it was not meant for her children, did she say who it was meant for? — No.

Have you told anyone your suspicions? I have told a couple.

The Police Magistrate — Outside your own family? — Yes.

The Inspector — Did you tell the police? — No; but they have been told.

How did you know? — My brother, Dan, told them.

To which police? — I don't know. You didn't tell me.

Do you know he told somebody? — I know he told somebody.

The Police Magistrate — Did he tell you he told somebody?— Yes.

Do your father and mother know Dan's suspicions? — Yes.

How long have they known? — Three or four weeks.

Before they gave evidence here? — I don't know. I have known that length of time.

Do you know they knew he suspected somebody? — I don't know.

Do you know Dan suspects somebody? — I don't know.

What I want to know is whether your father and mother know of your suspicions? — I don't know.

How long have you had these suspicions — About three weeks.

And have you taken any action in consequence of these suspicions?

Have you tried to do anything? — Dan told the police, and I don't know.

You don't know whether he told the police?

Have you done anything yourself?— No.

Online