Gatton Murders - Acting Sergeant William John Arrell

Gatton Murders

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Acting Sergeant William John Arrell

William Arrell Family

As From the 1st November, 1898.

Acting-Sergeant William John Arrell Promoted To Sergeant of Police in Gatton.

Constable W. Arrell, Acting C.P.S. To be Sergeant at Gatton.

Acting Sergeant William Arrell, Reg. No. 480.

Joined the force in October, 1877.

1887-NERANG

April 1890. Senior Constable Arrell, of Nerang, has been has transferred to Mellum Creek.

The Brisbane Courier Tuesday 20 May 1890

OFFICIAL NOTIFICATION.

Senior constable Arrell, to be acting clerk of petty sessions at Landsborough.

Harrisville in 1892.

18/01/1898. Acting Sergeant Arrell, of Harrisville, who has been promoted to the charge of the Gatton station, arrived here on Saturday last (15/01/1898), accompanied by his, wife and family.

Left Gatton in February 1901, and was retired from the police force on medical grounds on 1 May 1908. Born in 1853. He died in Bank Street, West End, Brisbane, 5 June 1932 aged 79. Buried 7 June 1932 Toowong Cemetery. Private Interment.

The Brisbane Courier Wednesday 16 July 1890

SERIOUS SHOOTING AFFRAY.

A shooting affray took place at Mellum Creek at 10.30 p.m. on the 13th instant. On     Monday Senior-constable Arrell, of Landsborough, reported by wire to the Commissioner of Police as follows:—At about 10 o'clock last night Patrick Fitzpatrick, a navvy, shot Edward Bourke, storekeeper, Landsborough, through the shoulder with a revolver. A dispute arose between them over the payment of a bill. Bourke very bad. Arrested Fitzpatrick at daybreak this morning.

The wounded man was brought down by train to the Brisbane Hospital yesterday morning, when it was ascertained that his case was not so critical as had been anticipated. In conversation with a reporter in the afternoon, Bourke made the following statement concerning the circumstances of the outrage :—

"I was collecting money on Sunday afternoon at Cobb's Camp. After I returned home Mrs. Banbury, a neighbour of mine, sent for me, stating she was anxious to settle her     account. While I was engaged with Mrs. Banbury, Fitzpatrick entered the house (Mrs. Banbury's house) and tendered me half-a-sovereign in settlement of his account. He had previously paid me £1, leaving a balance of 7s. still owing. Although under the influence of drink Fitzpatrick was not what you would call drunk. he said to me, 'You had better take that 7s.' I said that I had no change. but that probably Mrs. Banbury could oblige me. The latter then handed Fitzpatrick 10s. in silver.

Fitzpatrick turned to me and said, ' I'll see you in hell before I'll pay you.' I said, 'Very well,' and 'that it didn't matter.' Fitzpatrick then assaulted me, and subsequently went away to his camp. In a little while I saw him retrning towards Mrs. Banbury's, armed with a revolver. I was outside finishing my talk with Mrs. Banbury when I saw him run across the road. He didn't see me, so I ran round the house and hid in a room at the side. Then I heard a shot fired, and fearing that Fitzpatrick had shot one of the women or children. I ran round with the intention of seizing him from behind and gaining possession of the pistol. As I approached him he saw me, and, turning round, fired at me point blank, wounding me in the shoulder. Then he struck me twice with his fists."

At latest accounts last night Fitzpatrick was progressing as favourably as could be expected.

The Brisbane Courier Monday 2 May 1892

OFFICIAL NOTIFICATIONS.

(From Saturday's Government Gazette.)

Appointments.

The following members of the Police Force to be acting clerks of petty sessions at the places mentioned in connection with their respective names:-Senior-constable W. Arrell, at Harrisville, in the room of Sergeant R. F. Woodcroft, transferred; Senior-constable J. Chalmers, at Landsborough, in the room of Senior-constable W. Arrell, transferred; Constable G. Sutton, at Woombye, in tho room of Senior-constable J. Chalmers, transferred.

The following members of the Police Force to be inspectors of slaughter houses, &c., in the places mentioned in connection with their respective names-namely: Senior-constable W. Arrell, at Harrisville, in the room of Sergeant R. F. Woodcroft, transferred; Senior-constable J. Chalmers, at Landsborough, in the room of Senior-constable W. Arrell, transferred; Constable J. Johnston, at Yandina, in the room of Constable G. Sutton, transferred.

The Brisbane Courier Saturday 20 November 1897

LEGAL NOTICES.

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF QUEENSLAND.

In the LANDS and GOODS of SARAH ARRELL, late of Wooloowin, near Brisbane, in the Colony of Queensland, Widow, Deceased, Intestate.

Notice is hereby given that, after the expiration of fourteen days from the pub- lication hereof, application will be made to this Honourable Court that LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION of the real and personal estate of the abovenamed Sarah Arrell, deceased, who died Intestate, may be granted to WILLIAM JOHN ARRELL, of Harrisville, in the Colony of Queensland, Sergeant of Police, the Eldest Son of the said deceased.

Dated this Nineteenth day of November, A.D. 1897.

J. BENNION PRICE, Solicitor for the said William John Arrell, 145 Queen-street, Brisbane.

The Brisbane Courier Monday 14 February 1898

TRANSMISSION BY DEATH. REAL PROPERTY ACTS OF 1861 AND 1877.

Notice is hereby given, that applications have been made for the Registration of Transmission of Title to the Lands herein- after mentioned. Particulars of such applications are given below, and any person desiring to oppose must do so by lodging a Caveat, on or before the day specified, at the Principal Office of the Registrar of Titles, in Brisbane, unless the lands are situated within the Central or Northern District, in which case the Caveat must be  lodged at the local District Registry at Rockhampton or Townsville.

Name of Deceased Proprietor.-Sarah Arrell, late of Wooloowin, near Brisbane, widow.

Date of Death.-13th November, 1897.

Name of Claimant.-William John Arrell, of Gatton, sergeant of police.

Description and Situation of Land.-Re subdivisions 130, 131, 144, and 145 of sub-division 1 of portion_193, county of Stanley, parish of Enoggera.

Estate Claimed to be Transmitted.-Fee simple.

Particulars of Will or Otherwise.-Letters of Administration.

Date within which Caveat may be Lodged.-19th March, 1898.

The Brisbane Courier Monday 31 January 1898

Police Force.-The following to be acting clerks of petty sessions at the places specified:-Acting Sergeant W. Arrell, at Gatton, in the room of Sergeant A. M'Donald, transferred; and Acting Sergeant N. J. King, at Harrisville, in the room of Acting Sergeant W. Arrell, transferred. The following to be inspectors of slaughter-houses and of cattle intended for slaughter at the places specified:-Sergeant A. M'Donald, at Deep Creek, in the room of Constable J. M'Neill, transferred; Acting Sergeant W. Arrell, at Gatton, In the room of Sergeant A. M'Donald, transferred; and Acting Sergeant N. J. King, in the room of Acting Sergeant W. Arrell, transferred. The following to be assistant district registrars of births and deaths at the places specified, Sergeant J. Kelly, at Southport, for the registry district of Logan, in the room of Acting Sergeant N. J. King, transferred; and Constable J. M'Laughlin, at Kilkivan, for the registry district of Gympie, in the room of Constable J. M. Brown, transferred.

Arrell’s Father?

Wednesday 1 June 1881

The door was open.

In the reporters' room a death-like silence reigned. "Then in a voice monotonous and hollow as a ghost's" the strange man told his tale.

There had been a curious accident at Gatton.

Police Constable Arrell was engaged in grooming his horse, which, fastened by a halter, had become restless, and rearing suddenly over had broken his neck.

Death had been instantaneous.

"Dear me, very dreadful, very, very dreadful!" said our sub-editor rubbing his hands in a manner there was no mistaking as he bowed his informant downstairs. "Many thanks, sir, for these sad details; good-night.”

In the midst of life we are in death.

Good-night, my dear sir." Then a great sigh of satisfied relief went up from the reporters' room, and it was felt that Constable Arrell had committed a noble act of self-sacrifice in rescuing the morning's paper from utter dullness by breaking his neck.

In spite of the decorous gravity of our sub-editor's face, a certain buoyancy of gait, which had replaced the former desponding listlessness, told us who knew him of the elation of his soul. Suddenly he remembered that we had no particulars of the deceased, and a reporter was despatched, who caught the informant within fifty yards of the office door. "Had the poor creature any youngsters asked the breathless reporter.” "Youngsters?" repeated the other; "I can't say; but I think he was a gelding." "I beg your pardon?" "Anyhow he was a chestnut, I know that much." "You mistake me," commenced the reporter, "I mean the poor man who broke his neck, Constable Arrell, you know." Then there was a loud bout of laughter, which, penetrating the window of the reporters room, fell somehow like a chill upon everybody, it was only the horse after all, and no one dared go near tho editor's den for the rest of the night- ENDYMION.

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